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Russell S. Babcock
Attorney at Law - Certified Specialist, Criminal Law

1901 First Avenue, Suite 138 San Diego CA 92101

The blind mule in san diego tijuana

blindmule

 

“Blind Mule” Book by Russell Babcock

San Diego federal defense attorney Russell Babcock has just finished his first work of fiction, “The Blind Mule.”Russell has drawn upon his extensive experience in federal  criminal defense to write a suspenseful story about a traveler who is arrested at the San Diego/ Tijuana international border with cocaine, but who strongly proclaims his innocence.

In contrast to many crime novels, Russell has described the police procedures and the federal criminal trial procedure with accuracy. Russell wrote this novel primarily as a way to educate the public about the plight of blind mules.  He thought that a fast paced criminal thriller that was realistic would capture the attention of more readers than a scholarly treastise.  The Blind Mule is available now at www.blind-mule.com or the Amazon kindle edition by clicking here.

Chapter 1

 

And now for a sample of the novel . . . .

Mark Porter, celebrated criminal defense attorney, stared at the photograph in his steady hand. Camila’s smile was brave, serene, but with just a hint of false bravado that meant underneath she was afraid. The baby, Esperanza, was wrapped in a lacy pink shawl, knit by Camila’s mother. Mark’s hand began to tremble, and the picture blurred. His baby daughterwhom he had yet to meetMark set the picture down on his teak desk and splashed a shot of Ron de Caldas into his coffee cup. It was quiet in the office suitetoo quiet in downtown San Diego. He tossed the rum much too quickly to enjoy it and then poured another. The ticking clock on the wall irritated him. And the pounding of his heart reminded him that his destiny was rushing toward him.

The phone stayed silent. In law school, professors taught evidence, trial practice, criminal procedure—but not patience. No one could teach a trial attorney how to wait, and Mark Porter had never developed an ability to do so gracefully, not even now, when the verdict he waited on was his own.

The months had gone by so fast. The New Year came in an unusual rush with the hiring of a new legal associate, Jason Spurlock, to whom Mark now entrusted his life.

And then there was Camila. On a business trip to Medellín, Colombia years earlier, Mark had fallen in love. After decades of hunger, waiting, loneliness, he finally now had it all. But he knew that he could lose it all in a matter of seconds.

The telephone rang, jarring him back to reality. He knew that this would be the call. He answered even before the first ring had finished.

“Yes,” he gasped, trying to maintain control of his breath.

“We have a verdict,” Judge Jenkins’s clerk announced in her dry, monotone voice, hanging up before giving Mark a chance to say anything. Mark took one last deep swig of rum before walking the three blocks to the federal courthouse.

 

 


© 2010 Russell S. Babcock - Bilingual San Diego Criminal Defense Attorney & Lawyer